History

History of the Administrative Law Symposium

In 1969–70, Randolph May spearheaded an ambitious new project for the Duke Law Journal: an annual review of administrative procedure. He solicited a few articles by professors and practitioners, and Journal members wrote pieces on the year’s developments in administrative law.

With this issue the Journal initiates a major project designed to produce an annual commentary on each year’s major developments in the field of federal administrative law. . . . We hope by our project to report and analyze those developments which are of general significance, presenting in one volume a discussion of current controversial issues which should be of interest both to the infrequent agency practitioner and to the attorney or agency member who desires a cross-agency perspective on those issues. Because of both space and knowledge limitations, we do not propose to report every important decision, rule, and enactment; rather, we shall undertake to give detailed attention to those issues which appear to be of greatest general interest.

Project: Federal Administrative Law Developments—1969, 1970 DUKE L.J. 67.

The Journal’s administrative law issue retained this format for several years until it switched to the symposium format common among law reviews today.

History

History of the Administrative Law Symposium

In 1969–70, Randolph May spearheaded an ambitious new project for the Duke Law Journal: an annual review of administrative procedure. He solicited a few articles by professors and practitioners, and Journal members wrote pieces on the year’s developments in administrative law.

With this issue the Journal initiates a major project designed to produce an annual commentary on each year’s major developments in the field of federal administrative law. . . . We hope by our project to report and analyze those developments which are of general significance, presenting in one volume a discussion of current controversial issues which should be of interest both to the infrequent agency practitioner and to the attorney or agency member who desires a cross-agency perspective on those issues. Because of both space and knowledge limitations, we do not propose to report every important decision, rule, and enactment; rather, we shall undertake to give detailed attention to those issues which appear to be of greatest general interest.

Project: Federal Administrative Law Developments—1969, 1970 DUKE L.J. 67.

The Journal’s administrative law issue retained this format for several years until it switched to the symposium format common among law reviews today.