DLJ Online

Comment On Ruben and Blocher: Too Damn Many Cases, and an Absent Supreme Court

Posted on September 21st, 2018

Volume 68 September 2018 COMMENT ON RUBEN AND BLOCHER: TOO DAMN MANY CASES, AND AN ABSENT SUPREME COURT Sanford Levinson††. W. St. John Garwood and W. St. John Garwood Jr. Centennial Chair in Law, University of Texas Law School; Professor of Government, University of Texas at Austin. I am, as always, grateful to Mark Graber Continue Reading »

Devising Rule of Law Baselines: The Next Step in Quantitative Studies of Judging

Posted on May 18th, 2018

Volume 67 May 2018 devising rule of law baselines: the next step in quantitative studies of judging Brian Z. Tamanaha††. John S. Lehmann University Professor, Washington University School of Law. This Article originally appeared on the Legal Workshop as part of the Duke Law Journal’s 2010 “Symposium on Evaluating Judging, Judges, and Judicial Institutions.”   Continue Reading »

Distinguishing Causal and Normative Questions in Empirical Studies of Judging

Posted on May 18th, 2018

Volume 67 May 2018 Distinguishing Causal and Normative Questions in Empirical Studies of Judging Patrick S. Shin††. Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor of Law, Suffolk University Law School; J.D., Harvard Law School; Ph.D. (Philosophy), Harvard University. This Article originally appeared on the Legal Workshop as part of the Duke Law Journal’s 2010 “Symposium Continue Reading »

Investigating Judicial Responses to Rules

Posted on May 18th, 2018

Volume 67 May 2018 Investigating Judicial Responses to Rules Emily Sherwin††. Frank B. Ingersoll Professor of Law, Cornell Law School. This Article originally appeared on the Legal Workshop as part of the Duke Law Journal’s 2010 “Symposium on Evaluating Judging, Judges, and Judicial Institutions.”   Much has been written about the process by which judges Continue Reading »

Diversity, Tenure, and Dissent

Posted on May 18th, 2018

Volume 67 May 2018 Diversity, Tenure, and Dissent Joanna Shepherd††. Professor of Law, Emory University School of Law. This Article originally appeared on the Legal Workshop as part of the Duke Law Journal’s 2010 “Symposium on Evaluating Judging, Judges, and Judicial Institutions.”   The primary goal of the Duke Law Journal’s Symposium on Evaluating Judging, Continue Reading »

Talking Judges

Posted on May 18th, 2018

Volume 67 May 2018 TALKING JUDGES Jack Knight & Mitu Gulati††. Frederic Cleaveland Professor of Law and Political Science, Duke University; Professor of Law, Duke University School of Law. Thanks to our colleague and co-teacher, Dean David Levi (formerly the Chief Judge on the Eastern District of California), for numerous conversations about these issues. He Continue Reading »

Evaluating Judges

Posted on May 18th, 2018

Volume 67 May 2018 EVALUATING JUDGES Judge Harris Hartz††. Circuit Judge, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit. This Article originally appeared on the Legal Workshop as part of the Duke Law Journal’s 2010 “Symposium on Evaluating Judging, Judges, and Judicial Institutions.”   Improving the quality of the judiciary is a noble cause. I Continue Reading »

Evaluating Judges and Judicial Institutions: Reorienting the Perspective

Posted on May 18th, 2018

Volume 67 May 2018 Evaluating Judges and Judicial Institutions: Reorienting the Perspective Mitu Gulati, David E. Klein & David F. Levi††. Professor of Law, Duke University School of Law; Associate Professor of Politics, University of Virginia; Dean and Professor of Law, Duke University School of Law. Previously, Dean Levi was the Chief Judge of the Continue Reading »

Justice and Judgment Among the Whomever: An Anthropological Approach to Judging

Posted on May 18th, 2018

Volume 67 May 2018 Justice and Judgment Among the Whomever: An Anthropological Approach to Judging John Conley††. William Rand Kenan Jr. Professor of Law, University of North Carolina School of Law. This Article originally appeared on the Legal Workshop as part of the Duke Law Journal’s 2010 “Symposium on Evaluating Judging, Judges, and Judicial Institutions.” Continue Reading »

Quantitative Legal History—Empirics and the Rule of Law in the Antebellum Judiciary

Posted on May 18th, 2018

Volume 67 May 2018 QUANTITATIVE LEGAL HISTORY—EMPIRICS AND THE RULE OF LAW IN THE ANTEBELLUM JUDICIARY Alfred L. Brophy††. D. Paul Jones Chairholder in Law, University of Alabama Law. I would like to thank the participants in Duke Law School’s Evaluating Judging, Judges, and Judicial Institutions conference for their assistance with these thoughts, especially Mitu Continue Reading »

DLJ Online

Comment On Ruben and Blocher: Too Damn Many Cases, and an Absent Supreme Court

Posted on September 21st, 2018

Volume 68 September 2018 COMMENT ON RUBEN AND BLOCHER: TOO DAMN MANY CASES, AND AN ABSENT SUPREME COURT Sanford Levinson††. W. St. John Garwood and W. St. John Garwood Jr. Centennial Chair in Law, University of Texas Law School; Professor of Government, University of Texas at Austin. I am, as always, grateful to Mark Graber Continue Reading »

Devising Rule of Law Baselines: The Next Step in Quantitative Studies of Judging

Posted on May 18th, 2018

Volume 67 May 2018 devising rule of law baselines: the next step in quantitative studies of judging Brian Z. Tamanaha††. John S. Lehmann University Professor, Washington University School of Law. This Article originally appeared on the Legal Workshop as part of the Duke Law Journal’s 2010 “Symposium on Evaluating Judging, Judges, and Judicial Institutions.”   Continue Reading »

Distinguishing Causal and Normative Questions in Empirical Studies of Judging

Posted on May 18th, 2018

Volume 67 May 2018 Distinguishing Causal and Normative Questions in Empirical Studies of Judging Patrick S. Shin††. Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor of Law, Suffolk University Law School; J.D., Harvard Law School; Ph.D. (Philosophy), Harvard University. This Article originally appeared on the Legal Workshop as part of the Duke Law Journal’s 2010 “Symposium Continue Reading »

Investigating Judicial Responses to Rules

Posted on May 18th, 2018

Volume 67 May 2018 Investigating Judicial Responses to Rules Emily Sherwin††. Frank B. Ingersoll Professor of Law, Cornell Law School. This Article originally appeared on the Legal Workshop as part of the Duke Law Journal’s 2010 “Symposium on Evaluating Judging, Judges, and Judicial Institutions.”   Much has been written about the process by which judges Continue Reading »

Diversity, Tenure, and Dissent

Posted on May 18th, 2018

Volume 67 May 2018 Diversity, Tenure, and Dissent Joanna Shepherd††. Professor of Law, Emory University School of Law. This Article originally appeared on the Legal Workshop as part of the Duke Law Journal’s 2010 “Symposium on Evaluating Judging, Judges, and Judicial Institutions.”   The primary goal of the Duke Law Journal’s Symposium on Evaluating Judging, Continue Reading »

Talking Judges

Posted on May 18th, 2018

Volume 67 May 2018 TALKING JUDGES Jack Knight & Mitu Gulati††. Frederic Cleaveland Professor of Law and Political Science, Duke University; Professor of Law, Duke University School of Law. Thanks to our colleague and co-teacher, Dean David Levi (formerly the Chief Judge on the Eastern District of California), for numerous conversations about these issues. He Continue Reading »

Evaluating Judges

Posted on May 18th, 2018

Volume 67 May 2018 EVALUATING JUDGES Judge Harris Hartz††. Circuit Judge, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit. This Article originally appeared on the Legal Workshop as part of the Duke Law Journal’s 2010 “Symposium on Evaluating Judging, Judges, and Judicial Institutions.”   Improving the quality of the judiciary is a noble cause. I Continue Reading »

Evaluating Judges and Judicial Institutions: Reorienting the Perspective

Posted on May 18th, 2018

Volume 67 May 2018 Evaluating Judges and Judicial Institutions: Reorienting the Perspective Mitu Gulati, David E. Klein & David F. Levi††. Professor of Law, Duke University School of Law; Associate Professor of Politics, University of Virginia; Dean and Professor of Law, Duke University School of Law. Previously, Dean Levi was the Chief Judge of the Continue Reading »

Justice and Judgment Among the Whomever: An Anthropological Approach to Judging

Posted on May 18th, 2018

Volume 67 May 2018 Justice and Judgment Among the Whomever: An Anthropological Approach to Judging John Conley††. William Rand Kenan Jr. Professor of Law, University of North Carolina School of Law. This Article originally appeared on the Legal Workshop as part of the Duke Law Journal’s 2010 “Symposium on Evaluating Judging, Judges, and Judicial Institutions.” Continue Reading »

Quantitative Legal History—Empirics and the Rule of Law in the Antebellum Judiciary

Posted on May 18th, 2018

Volume 67 May 2018 QUANTITATIVE LEGAL HISTORY—EMPIRICS AND THE RULE OF LAW IN THE ANTEBELLUM JUDICIARY Alfred L. Brophy††. D. Paul Jones Chairholder in Law, University of Alabama Law. I would like to thank the participants in Duke Law School’s Evaluating Judging, Judges, and Judicial Institutions conference for their assistance with these thoughts, especially Mitu Continue Reading »